Catalina - Capri - 25s International Assocaition Logo(2006)  
Assn Members Area · Join
Association Forum
Association Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Forum Users | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Catalina/Capri 25/250 Sailor's Forums
 Catalina 25 Specific Forum
 High winds
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Oneday
Deckhand

Member Avatar

USA
20 Posts

Initially Posted - 06/16/2022 :  04:05:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If it’s 15-20 knots and you are out there, what is you setup? Jib alone? Main alone or some combo? Thanks Dan

Steve Milby
Past Commodore

Members Avatar

USA
5723 Posts

Response Posted - 06/16/2022 :  06:02:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It depends on the location, the boat and the sailor.

Sailing in 20-25 knot winds on a small inland lake is very different from sailing on the Great Lakes or a large Bay in the same winds. Waves become much higher when the wind blows over a long fetch.

A 40' boat can sail comfortably in winds that would be wet, bumpy and hazardous for a 25' boat. When a 25' 4000-5000 lb boat beats to windward against choppy seas, the boat shudders nearly to a stop when the waves strike it on the bow. When a 40' 20,000 lb boat beats to windward against the same choppy seas, its weight, momentum and more powerful sails helps it keep moving against the chop.

A skilled sailor who knows how to depower his jib and mainsail can extend the useful wind range of his sails by sail trimming techniques. Good helmsmanship is also important. I saw one helmsman steering about 3-5 deg. off of closehauled to try to power the boat through the chop. He made very little headway to windward and the primary winch was making ominous sounds like it was about to rip out of the deck. After a change of helmsmen, the next person steered more closehauled, with the sails just at the edge of luffing. The boat stood up better to the wind and waves, made noticeably better speed over ground, and the winches quieted down.

Most of us don't have an accurate anemometer on our boats, and each of us has our notion of what 15-20 kts looks and feels like. What really matters is how the ambient conditions of wind and wave affect the boat.

When the wind rises and the boat begins to labor and heel excessively, I depower the sails first. Next, I reef the mainsail. If the jib is roller furling, I roll up about 1/3 of it. If the boat is still heeling excessively, I take down all the sails and start the motor.

If I'm sailing long distance in blue water, or if the boat has an inboard engine, I'll do things differently, but most of my sailing is in a lake or bay, and, when you can no longer keep the boat from heeling excessively under sail, it's time to take the sails down and motor to shelter. Outboard motors don't do well motoring to windward against a significant chop, so your only realistic choice is to motor downwind.

Steve Milby J/24 "Captiva Wind"
previously C&C 35, Cal 25, C25 TR/FK, C22
Past Commodore
Go to Top of Page

Stinkpotter
Master Marine Consultant

Members Avatar

Djibouti
8873 Posts

Response Posted - 06/16/2022 :  06:58:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Daniel... From your location, we'd guess you're sailing in Oyster Bay or Huntington, and out into Long Island Sound (the other side of my old stomping grounds). We rarely were out in over 15, but with a 130% roller-genny, often sailed in blustery, gusty conditions on that alone. It gives up a few degrees of pointing in favor of comfort, especially in gusts, since the primary area of the sail is so much lower than the main, and the top can twist off more (by moving the sheet blocks back, which also depowers the sail).

The larger the headsail, the less unbalanced the helm is on that sail alone, since the center of effort is farther aft, which argues for not reducing it if using it alone. Another "effort" is greatly reduced: my saying was, "Pull one string and you're sailing, pull another and you're not!"

All of this also suggests reefing the main before reducing headsail, and other than in true storm conditions, maybe not reducing the headsail at all. Of course if you're racing or really trying to get somewhere to windward (we we rarely did either), then a balanced rig (reducing both sails proportionally) is probably best.

We took on 30+ one day, delivering our new-to-us C-25 from Groton to Darien... The sails stayed furled and the little motor pushed us through the 3-4' chop as we tried to stay pretty close to the north shore in a NW blow. Upon our arrival, the marine police were incredulous! And we ran aground--the wind had been blowing the water out of LIS. Sorry--off topic!

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic/Stonington CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage, ex-OUPV,
Now on Eastern 27 $+!nkp*+ Sarge (but still sailing when I can).
Go to Top of Page

Voyager
Master Marine Consultant

Members Avatar

USA
5016 Posts

Response Posted - 06/16/2022 :  09:34:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quick questions:
How many reefs do you have in your mainsail? 1?, 2? I only have 1, so I’d reef in 15 kts
Do you have a furler for your headsail? If so, use it to shorten sail as Dave advises.
If not, do you have a storm jib, 75%, 100% or 130% jib genoa. Smaller is better to keep the balance.
Do you sail alone or with experienced crew? If you have crew, put them on the windward rail. If they’re inexperienced crew, stay in port. No point scaring your crew.
Lastly, if you sail on the south shore of Long Island Sound (north shore of LI), your most troublesome wind direction is NE or ENE. They can make your life miserable.
Northwest winds are usually gusty, so what started as 15-20 can gust to 30. That’ll put you over and can make you round up and broach.
My 2˘

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
Go to Top of Page

Stinkpotter
Master Marine Consultant

Members Avatar

Djibouti
8873 Posts

Response Posted - 06/17/2022 :  07:10:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
BTW, I "figured out" you have a C-25... Coincidentally, the responses you've gotten are from C-25 owners (past and present). The C-250 is a significantly different boat in several ways, especially in heavy air. It would be useful to you to create a "signature" in your Profile (menu above) with your model, year, keel, rig, and where you're sailing, as many folks here have done. Then answers to many questions can be more helpful. Just a thought...

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic/Stonington CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage, ex-OUPV,
Now on Eastern 27 $+!nkp*+ Sarge (but still sailing when I can).
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Association Forum © since 1999 Catalina Capri 25s International Association Go To Top Of Page
Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.06
Notice: The advice given on this site is based upon individual or quoted experience, yours may differ.
The Officers, Staff and members of this site only provide information based upon the concept that anyone utilizing this information does so at their own risk and holds harmless all contributors to this site.