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Voyager
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Initially Posted - 08/19/2022 :  08:17:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The sun is still hot and the days are still long. Time and date tells me we still have 13-1/2 hours of daylight left for outdoor activities. For me, this time of year - the next 60 days it the “golden hour” of the sailing season. This is when I enjoy an overnight raft up with friends around the Sound.
A buddy from Northport LI, and a guy and his family from Madison CT with a Polynesian-style catamaran. We fire up the gas barbecue and grill some steaks, burgers, and fresh sliced zucchini.
Our usual haunts are Port Jefferson, LI, the Thimble Islands in Branford and the Norwalk Islands. I’m also happy to host them behind Charles Island in Milford if they’re passing by.
There’s still a lot of sailing season left, so go out and enjoy it. I’m looking forward to more adventures, and misadventures too!

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT

Voyager
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Response Posted - 08/19/2022 :  19:35:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Today I got some perfect wind and a friend and I sailed 10 miles down to Black Rock harbor at about 4.5kts. The weather was mid-80°s but it didn’t feel hot because of the wind. We grabbed some lunch at Cap’t Cove Seaport then headed back to Milford. The PJ Ferry, the P.T. Barnum, and we were on a collision course so we waited for it to pass. I called the skipper on the VHF and he saw me coming.
We came back running downwind on a run wing-and-wing with the waves crashing all around. Very exciting day for sailors.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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Stinkpotter
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Djibouti
8892 Posts

Response Posted - 08/20/2022 :  20:34:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Collision course" with the Port Jeff ferry in the Bridgeport Harbor channel--you bet you got out of the way, whether by negotiation or not! You get out of its way in the middle of Long Island Sound--fuggetabout sail vs. power! Those caps have a message to boaters: "STAY F%*#ing CLEAR!" I've encountered them in and outside of Port Jeff--not unlike the Orient-to-New London ferries by me now. (...not to mention the subs in and out of Groton--that's a whole nuther outa-the-way scenario I've found myself in.)

My info and wet finger say winds ran a steady S 9-12 this afternoon--can't get much nicer than that unless you want the rail buried or to be planing on the fronts of big whitecaps!

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic/Stonington CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage, ex-OUPV,
Now on Eastern 27 $+!nkp*+ Sarge (but still sailing when I can).

Edited by - Stinkpotter on 08/20/2022 20:37:07
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OLarryR
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Response Posted - 08/20/2022 :  21:36:37  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Had my run-ins with the Port Jefferson Oil Tanker, many, many years ago when I used to sail out of Huntington Bay Area with at that time, my 1980 ODay 23. After spending a night-over in the Oyster Bay Sand Hole, my spouse and I waited for the fog to lift and then planned to tack over to the Connecticut side of the Long Island Sound and then another long tack to get back to Huntington Harbor. However, when approaching the Connecticut side, the wind died down and the fog set back in. Could not see anything......As we then motored slowly toward Huntington Harbor (via compass/charts) and blowing a fog horn every so often, no one was around us as we only faintly heard fog horns in the distance......until we then faintly heard a rumble and then a large fog horn blast. We then traded horn blows more frequently until we heard someone yell "Do you see us". Just then I noticed it....the tanker was in front of us traveling east and we were headed south. I yelled back that we saw them and we were turning around. Once everything went quiet again, I turned back to my original heading.

Later on when the fog began to lift, we had the opening to Huntington Bay right in front of us.

When I tell the story it was scary but mostly an exciting adventure. But that was not the shared sentiment onboard.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Quantico, Va
http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html

Edited by - OLarryR on 08/20/2022 21:39:02
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Buzz Maring
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Response Posted - 08/21/2022 :  10:29:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by OLarryR

Later on when the fog began to lift, we had the opening to Huntington Bay right in front of us.


Is that when you found the time to change your underwear?

Wow ... 'harrowing story ... 'glad you made it through that.

Buzz Maring

~~Freya~~
C-25 SK/SR #68
Lake Dallas, TX
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zeil
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Response Posted - 08/21/2022 :  12:47:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Sometime ago, we were just taken a casual "sunday", sail from Point Roberts, WA. where we had a slip and crossed the 18 mile Strait of Juan de Fuca between the mainland and Vancouver island, which necessitates crossing, before you reach Saturna Island, a shipping lane used by all commercial and cruiseship traffic.

We were under full sail with light winds and a heavy current when, all of a sudden, around the corner of Saturna Island, two enormous ocean-going freighters headed our way going north. This made matters so much worse as we had kept our eyes on a south bound freighter who bows got larger and larger.

In a short matter of time, we found ourselves in the middle of three colossal freighters going in opposite directions and... all of them having to alter course to negotiate the sharp turn around the island.

Under sail with light winds and heavy currents but good visibility, even with motor assistance there was no way we could out-maneuver these monsters.

Then... all of a sudden we heard on our VHF "sailboat, stay your course", repeated several times. We acknowledged that and it was exactly, albeit with pounding hearts, what we did.

What a relief when we saw the enormous monstrous bows of all three ships heading up to point a course around our little insignificant blip on the water

Yes... our porta potty was busy for a bit... Be assured we'll avoid "sunday", sailing in or even close to shipping lanes for ever more.


Henk & Johanna
"Floating", a few off your "barnacles".
"Someday Lady" '95 C250WB #151 ('03 - 2016)
"Mariah" '96 C250WB #191 (2019...
"Lady J" '00 C250WK #499 (2021 - 2022)

Edited by - zeil on 08/21/2022 12:48:59
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 08/21/2022 :  16:29:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Larry, it sounds like you were using a navigation technique referred to as dead reckoning, a lost art in these days of GPS and cellular technology. Using compass headings, speed + time, and your charts, you could literally find your way in 0 visibility fog. I assume that you did not have a LORAN setup. The fact that you landed directly in front of your destination when the fog lifted was testament to your navigation skills. Fortunately for you, the errant tanker was being equally cautious in the fog. These days I’m not sure that the result would have been so good…

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 08/21/2022 :  16:39:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Henk, it was fortuitous that you had your VHF radio on and were actually paying attention to it. It’s not all that unusual for many boaters today to NEVER turn on the radio, even it difficult circumstances such as yours. It was a good thing that all three commercial captains had a keen eye on their radars and comprehended the dire situation that you were in. Of course, that’s what they get paid to do day-in, day-out. It’s probably a more common occurence than you’d imagine.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT

Edited by - Voyager on 08/21/2022 16:42:18
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OLarryR
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Response Posted - 08/21/2022 :  19:31:05  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The Oyster Bay Sandhole is not that far west of Huntington Bay and so two long tacks to get back was all that was needed. Even so, it’s not till you have been in dense fog that you really need to rely on your compass/charts and then realize they work well.

When I heard the tanker’s horn, I did not know what it was not being able to see it but I knew this was not going to be just another pleasure craft out for the day. Knowing I was heading across the Sound, I had a pretty good idea that whatever was coming our way probably was heading parallel to the Sound ....did not know for sure until Inthen saw their bow.

Back in those days, I did not have a VHF radio. These days, I do have one but generally never leave it on and only use it just prior to leaving the dock to get latest weather forecast. But having read this posting thread, I probably should get more use to using it and keeping it on when sailing. I assume that is what most of you do...keeping it on while sailing and not just when in an urgent situation ?

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Quantico, Va
http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html
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Stinkpotter
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Djibouti
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Response Posted - 08/21/2022 :  19:41:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Henk: The calling freighter captain knew that he had to exercise due caution coming around a blind turn, and you holding course and speed helped him plan the avoidance of you and the other oncoming freighter. Any maneuver on your part could have really screwed things up. That's one of the little-known parts of the rules of the road--the duty of a "stand-on vessel", which he (thankfully) declared you to be--avoiding a "shall we dance" scenario between a little sailboat two freighters that are also concerned with each other. Good on him!

I have several times gotten on the radio (Ch. 13 in a harbor) and asked the commercial vessel "What do you want me to do?" They appreciate it. (I tried it recently with a mega-yacht captain at a bridge--the answer wasn't as polite. Go figure...)

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic/Stonington CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage, ex-OUPV,
Now on Eastern 27 $+!nkp*+ Sarge (but still sailing when I can).

Edited by - Stinkpotter on 08/21/2022 19:52:00
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 08/22/2022 :  05:28:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Regarding the VHF, if I’m out sailing in my local area for an afternoon, I keep a dual watch on 16 and 13. Mostly you don’t hear much unless a stone barge or a ferry is just getting underway or approaching a harbor. Sometimes you hear the USCG report a boating mishap somewhere. Occasionally it becomes an interesting news story.
If I’m passage-making, there’s enough barge and commercial traffic in LI Sound so that if I pass Bridgeport, New Haven, New London, Norwalk harbors, the mouth of the Connecticut River or Long Island bays, it pays to keep an ear tuned to the VHF while eyeballing approaching vessels. An AIS receiver also helps.
If, however, I was generally sailing on a big recreational lake or a bay with little commercial traffic, I probably would not run my VHF at all. I sailed with a friend on Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire, and had brought my handheld VHF. It was absolutely quiet, even when the cruise boat “The Mt Washington” came by.That’s a different world.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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OLarryR
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Response Posted - 08/22/2022 :  07:32:09  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bruce, thanks for the waterway examples utilizing or not utilizing VHF. I’ll try to remember to start using it. Usually there is very light boat traffic in my area and the occasional barge/tug boat sticks to the boat channel, so there is rarely a mystery as to where they are heading.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Quantico, Va
http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 08/22/2022 :  09:04:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Larry, I think of it as a tool in the toolbox.
Dave, I agree with your example about raising an oncoming commercial boat on Ch13 or 16, 95% of the time you’ll get a constructive response. The captains are usually a little pleasantly surprised actually. Occasionally, you’ll get a wiseguy or someone having a bad day… takes all kinds.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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zeil
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Response Posted - 08/22/2022 :  22:14:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What... do you do when, oh heavens, your rudder irreparably breaks in half at the lower pintle and you see it drifting away.

Unbelief, oh goodness no, what's happening, panic, then... jump to action to gain control but... without a rudder?... there is no control, nothing... zip...

Of course it depends on each location, situation and conditions, when you, unexpectedly find your boat, just like that... rudderless.

Happened to us on the Trent/Severn Waterway some years back. We had made, weeks before our departure a replica 1 1/4" wood rudder to comply with the threshold depth of 5ft of the 40 some odd locks in the system we had to cross.

Examining the break later, it appeared it had absorbed water, lost some strength and under stress gave out.

We were under power at the time with the mast horizontal on deck and just a the point entering a connecting narrow waterway when a fast, large motorboat throwing a significant bow wave, threatened to push us of course. Snap..., went the rudder and we were instantly drifting helplessly.

Continuing to motor forward on our course only resulted in having the boat veer uncontrollably in all directions and, what's worse, bringing us close to traffic and unyielding rocks.

By quickly reversing with the 8 hp outboard, the boat came back under control and could be kept out of harms way.

Pfff... now what. With the boat now slowly reversing and under control we had now the time we needed to take off the broken top half including the pintles and replace it with our on-board spare rudder.

Disaster avoided, breathing easy again, we continued and completed the entire waterway having learned the lesson to anticipate and be prepared and... having vital spare parts on board


Henk & Johanna
"Floating", a few off your "barnacles".
"Someday Lady" '95 C250WB #151 ('03 - 2016)
"Mariah" '96 C250WB #191 (2019...
"Lady J" '00 C250WK #499 (2021 - 2022)

Edited by - zeil on 08/22/2022 22:22:52
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Stinkpotter
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Djibouti
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Response Posted - 08/23/2022 :  07:16:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've shared the experience of trying to steer a sailboat just with an outboard (no rudder), in forward gear. It's very different from steering with the outboard and the rudder together. Every twitch of the motor causes the boat to pivot, and correcting causes a worse pivot the opposite direction. I found the centerboard down made the pivoting worse. Reverse is a good solution--you're at least pulling the boat instead of pushing it. Meanwhile, speaking of VHF, if this exposed me to trouble or in a seaway, I might get on Ch 16 with a Pan-Pan call. (Not that most people would hear it...)

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic/Stonington CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage, ex-OUPV,
Now on Eastern 27 $+!nkp*+ Sarge (but still sailing when I can).
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Steve Milby
Past Commodore

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Response Posted - 08/23/2022 :  07:50:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carrying a spare rudder on an extended cruise is good preparation. On a boat with an outboard rudder, almost any plank with pintles will work in a pinch. It doesn't have to be NACA shaped.

Steering a sailboat with an outboard motor and no rudder is twitchy, but do-able. Jon boats and runabouts are steered the same way.

It helps to apply power gradually from a stop. If you apply too much power too soon, the prop torque kicks the stern to the side, and, when you push the tiller over to counteract that, it's easy to over-steer, causing the boat to veer the other way. Think in terms of applying power gradually, with a steady hand on the tiller, and making only very small adjustments of the tiller. Run at about half speed. At lower speeds, prop torque will be less and the boat will be less twitchy. At high speeds, a small movement of the engine's tiller will have a greater effect than it will at slower speeds.

Steve Milby J/24 "Captiva Wind"
previously C&C 35, Cal 25, C25 TR/FK, C22
Past Commodore

Edited by - Steve Milby on 08/23/2022 07:56:51
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zeil
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Response Posted - 08/23/2022 :  10:32:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

guys... that's exactly what happened. In a panic to get some measure of control, we over-steered and over-powered.

We should have known this behavior had we practiced steering the boat in a variety of conditions without the use of the rudder.

A nice feature of a water ballast is that it also has an easily removable rudder head. Our rudder break occurred below the aluminum head which, could be taken off the gudgeons and fixed in the cockpit by removing the old rudder blade and inserted with a new.

You guys are right, any old, pre-fitted, plank, blade or lumber will do fine in a pinch...

The swing-able rudder must be held straight down by the "mickey mouse" bearing balls, which, under too much pressure of weeds, speed or wave action, let go and the rudder becomes totally ineffective. We removed these ball-bearings and inserted a breakaway wood pin to hold the rudder straight down and still, in case of something hard hitting the rudder, provide swing-up safety



Henk & Johanna
"Floating", a few off your "barnacles".
"Someday Lady" '95 C250WB #151 ('03 - 2016)
"Mariah" '96 C250WB #191 (2019...
"Lady J" '00 C250WK #499 (2021 - 2022)
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 09/04/2022 :  08:47:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This thread took a couple of twists and turns… continuing my story.
Yesterday, a friend with a Wharram 21 wooden catamaran in Mystic CT and I took our regular occasional daysail out to Fishers Island Sound. Normally if there’s calm weather we just find a small beach on an island for swimming or drop a few fishing lines over and enjoy his “pontoon boat” with a few laughs and a few beers. Other boaters, never having seen such an unusual craft, will frequently engage us in conversation and ask about the boat. To amp up the conversation, he has a few beanbag chairs on the deck - kind of an homage and a throw back to the mid-century vintage of the boat.
Yesterday however,sea conditions and winds were excellent for sailing, so we decided to make the 8-mile run up to Watch Hill,RI, where there’s a barrier beach called Napatree Point and the water behind it is called Little Narragansett Bay”.
Now if I were to take Passage there, I’d have to stick to a very circuitous route up past the Stonington breakwater and behind an elongated sandbar to eventually descend into Watch Hill Harbor and Napatree. However, being two “canoe hulls” in the water with a 12” draft of the rudders, we could bypass the channel and just follow the powerboat channel into the bay. See chart 13205 for details.
BTW this is Dave Stinkpotters stomping ground, where you’ve probably seen the aerial photograph a few times on this forum.
We sailed the 8 miles making 8-12 knots on a reach in about an hour. Due to its proximity to Mystic and Newport, as we approached the harbor, we found a HUGE Labor Day crowd of boaters of all types, including big triple-decker fiberglass stinkpots, sleek classic sailing racers, old-school wooden cabin cruisers that you’d expect to see JFK, Bobby and Ted sailing around Hyannisport back in the day, brand new catamaran sails, a Dutch steel-hulled ketch, and a collection of standard late 20th century monohulls, and us. There must’ve been over 200 boats stretching out at least a 1/2 mile or so up behind the sand spit.
It was an ideal weather day: 78-80°, low humidity, nice sea breeze, swirling cirrus clouds overhead painting on deep azure blue skies. Clean waters that were deep blue in deeper water, light blue and aquamarine in shoals, all with cats paws reflecting the bright sunlight.
Everyone there seemed to found a nirvana of boating and was on a natural high, because as far as we could tell, everyone was friendly and waving, no jackassery on jetskis or runabouts, and there was just a welcoming aura all around. (No I didn’t take any ecstasy, it was 100% natural)
We double-anchored off the beach (bow and stern) and swam in the crystal blue warm waters of summer’s end, we ate some lunch and enjoyed a few cold ones, then it was getting late so we headed back on the opposite reach. Even as we were leaving we saw more and more beautiful boats arriving.
We sailed back to Mystic and along the way we could see Block Island about 15 miles offshore. We came back into the harbor ghosting upstream wing and wing along with the parade of other boats coming back for the day. It was quite a spectacle seeing the great variety of classic boats on view in Mystic Harbor.
I won’t soon forget this day as the summer begins to turn to fall in New England, there are still a few more adventures yet to be had.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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glivs
Admiral

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Response Posted - 09/06/2022 :  05:02:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for posting Bruce. It’s great to learn of other’s sailing venues and my sailing these past couple of summers has largely been vicarious. LI Sound has always intrigued me although my first hand experience is nil. As you said let’s hope a few more adventures this summer like ahead.

Gerry & Leslie; Malletts Bay, VT
"Great Escape" 1989 C-25 SR/WK #5972
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 09/06/2022 :  06:41:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry - while I enjoy LISound, I’ve been curious about Lake Champlain and Lake Superior. For example, I have been across the islands between Burlington and Champlain NY, and the lake looks beautiful. I’d been to Vergennes as well where the lake is a bit narrower. I’ve also been to Duluth Bay where Superior just goes out forever. I’d love a chance to actually (as opposed to vicariously) sail there. Other places on my list are Puget sound, San Francisco Bay, Chesapeake, the Florida Keys… the list goes on. Oh! to have another lifetime too.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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glivs
Admiral

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Response Posted - 09/08/2022 :  16:47:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree Bruce...much to explore and far too little time or resources. Under other circumstances I would gladly invite you to join me for a sail on Lake Champlain anytime but due to life's twists and turns I am as of last fall now living 200 mi west of the lake. I looked into moving my boat to a marina on the east end of Lake Ontario but my life is just too hectic at the moment but even then it would still be an hour drive from my residence at best. Change is in the wind.

Gerry & Leslie; Malletts Bay, VT
"Great Escape" 1989 C-25 SR/WK #5972
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Stinkpotter
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Djibouti
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Response Posted - 09/08/2022 :  18:57:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by glivs

...now living 200 mi west of the lake. I looked into moving my boat to a marina on the east end of Lake Ontario... still be an hour drive from my residence at best. Change is in the wind.

Ithaca?

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic/Stonington CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage, ex-OUPV,
Now on Eastern 27 $+!nkp*+ Sarge (but still sailing when I can).
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 09/08/2022 :  22:12:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This weekend here in NE we will get the ocean swells from Hurricane Earl that is over 500 miles away! Luckily I’m tucked deep inside LI Sound, so while the ocean-facing beaches will get it, the protected bays will not. I might take a drive to Newport or RI South County this weekend to see the waves.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain — Milford, CT
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glivs
Admiral

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Response Posted - 09/09/2022 :  04:41:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I should have said “from Burlington” rather than west of the lake. I’m just outside Ogdensburg, NY on a small River but have family at Alexandria Bay and my mother (97 and going strong) is in a care facility just outside Sackets Harbor…and a friendly marina.

Everyone on LI Sound….best to you.

Gerry & Leslie; Malletts Bay, VT
"Great Escape" 1989 C-25 SR/WK #5972
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